MA Alumni

Odelia  Ahdout

Odelia Ahdout

Linguistics

Read More
Subject: Hebrew psychological verbs and nominalizations

Supervisor: Dr. Ivy Sichel

Abstract: in my thesis I present and analyze the argument and event structure of Hebrew Psych nominals in light of, and with emphasis on the differences between the psychological lexicon of English and the rich Psych lexicon of Hebrew. I claim that this richness is what allows us to isolate meaning ingredients in verbal forms as to obtain a more direct mapping of meaning to form, thereby expanding the current knowledge regarding Psych verbs and their nominalizations. However, in spite of the meaning-form flexibility available in Hebrew, there are nevertheless also inter-language restrictions on the types of psychological nominalizations available in the language, depending on morphological form, i.e. verbal pattern. To show how the language is both restrictive as well as flexible, I focus on semantic contrasts between Psych nominalizations derived from the hif’il and pi’el verbal patterns.  

Read Less
chen

Chen Amram

Department of Jewish History

Read More

Research subject: The design of the educational system infrastructure (1953-1948)

Abstract: The first decade succeeding the foundation of the state of Israel was filled with critical historic events and radical changes. In those years, as expected of a newly founded state, policymakers started to form the public infrastructure of Israel - including the educational system. It was the decade in which the main characteristics of the educational system ways were formed, as well as its goals, ways of action and structural aspects. My research intends to dwell upon the connection between the historical events and sociological aspects of Israel in that time and the design of the educational system infrastructure. The research will discuss the ways in which the educational system itself, being one of the ultimate devices for shaping the society, is derived from the political and historical events which happened in that crucial decade.

Read Less
Bar Avineri

Bar Avineri

Linguistics, Generative Track

Read More
Subject: Modality and evidentiality through syntax-semantics interface

 

Supervisors: Prof. Edit Doron, Dr. Aynat Rubinstein

 

Abstract: My work will refer to a phenomenon known in the literature as "the Actualization Effect", where modal expressions conjugated in preterit are interpreted as an action that has been carried out. My intention is to address the current theoretical literature related to this effect, focusing on semantic, syntactical and morphological aspects. These analyses will be examined with respect to Spoken Modern Hebrew data, as well as to written Hebrew corpora, from a diachronic perspective/

Read Less
Veronik  Avissar

Veronik Avissar

Philosophy

Read More
Subject: Are we obligated to forgive the people we love?

Supervisor: Dr. Sharon Krishek

Abstract: I am writing my thesis on a question that has been bothering me for quite some time, the question whether or not we are obligated to forgive the people we love? or, to put it somewhat differently, can we truly love someone and at the same time hold a negative attitude towards that person, believing that he wronged us?

 This is a complex question, which requires clarifying the basic terms with which it is concerns, namely forgiveness and love. In addition, it is also not clear what kind of obligation is in question. While every person on the street can understand the question asked, since it concerns two of the most basic concepts of human life, a closer look would reveal that it is far from easy to precisely define them.

 Given the complexity and width of the topic, I shall begin my discussion from the question whether or not we are ever obligated to forgive, regardless of our attitude towards the offender. Since our initial intuition is that an obligation to forgive belongs to the moral sphere, the first step would be ascertaining whether or not there could be a moral obligation to forgive.

 After concluding, through the discussion of the secondary literature on the subject, that in the moral sphere forgiveness is always supererogatory and never an obligation; I turn to a discussion of forgiveness as a religious duty, asking if forgiveness can be a moral prerogative and a religious duty. In this discussion I shall turn to Kierkegaard's conception of forgiveness, as presented in "Works of Love". His view is a view that binds forgiveness and love together.

 Yet deferring to Kierkegaard's view would entail accepting his religious framework, which many of us have trouble accepting. Trying to avoid an obligation to a religious-Christian framework, I shall check other models of love, in an attempt to ascertain whether there could be an obligation to forgive loved ones that is not of a religious nature. This inquiry will be based on the assumption that love does not necessarily belong to the moral domain. This will be the final step, after which I hope to offer a comprehensive answer to the question.

 

Read Less
asafb

Asaf Ben Haim

Archaeology and Ancient Middle Eastern studies

Read More
Subject: Cultural Sources of the Architecture of King Herod In Light of the Architectural Decoration in Herodium

Supervisor: Dr. Orit Peleg-Barkat

Abstract: My work concentrates on the architectural decoration in Herodium and on the cultural sources, which derive from the analysis and the context of the architectural items at the site. The focus of my research will be the various architectural assemblages which were revealed in the site and include more than a thousand pieces. Those items, the vast majority of which have never been scientifically analysed, will be presented in detail and several aspects will be examine, such as the materials and the carving technique, typology and their archaeological and architectural context. The long-run excavation project at Herodium enables us to identify a few constructive stages at the site, which can be aligned in a relative stratigraphy. Thus, examining the architectural items in their archaeological context might help us trace chronological changes in the architectural decoration of the site and to identify accordingly trends of progress and development in the Herod’s building program. Similarly, the project aims to suggest a reconstruction for some of the architectural units at the site in light of the architectural and decorative analysis, as well as its scale, material, typology and style of carving. The reconstruction of the architectural units and their decoration will help in understanding the architectural characteristics of Herodium in particular and King Herod’s architecture as a whole. Equipped with such knowledge, many unsolved questions that the sheer architectural plan cannot answer, might be addressed, as like: what are the important parts of building which have the most elaborate decoration? How did the upper parts of the towers look like? Can we figure the King’s most beloved palaces due to its decoration? 

Read Less
Shraga  Bick

Shraga Bick

Comparative Religion

Read More
Subject: 'But I am Prayer:' Voice, Body and the Anthropology of the Praying Self in Rabbinic and Syriac-Christian Literature

Supervisor: Prof. Brouria Bitton-Ashkelony

Abstract: My work explores the complex relations between voice and silence, in regard to how prayer was designed and constructed in Rabbinic and Syriac-Christian literature in Late Antiquity. In the Thesis I examine the interplay between Rabbinic and Syriac literature regarding perceptions of body and language, and from that I continue on to explore the different attitudes towards silent and bodily prayer.

The work focuses on the works of Aphrahat, Ephrem, the Book of Steps and John of Apamea - all Syrian writings of the fourth and fifth centuries, and on rabbinic literature from roughly the same period.

Read Less
levana

Levana Chajes

Department of Jewish Thought 

Read More

Subject: On the Discourse of Unity and the Discursive Unity of the Ma‘arekhet ha-elohut

Supervisor: Dr. Avishai Bar-Asher

Abstract: Ma’arekhet ha-ehlohut, though a foundational kabbalistic work, remains largely understudied. In past scholarship it has been argued that the work is composed of two distinct strata, each reflecting a distinct stage in the author's development from kabbalist to philosopher. In my research I would like to reexamine this in light of the idea that philosophy and Kabbalah were deeply integrated in this period.

MA Honors 2018/19
Read Less
Roni Danziger

Roni Danziger

Sociolinguistics

Read More
Subject: Compliments and compliment responses in Israeli Hebrew: Huji students in interaction

Supervisor: Aldina Rodriguez Quintana

Abstract: This dissertation will examine how Hebrew speakers respond to compliments by examining Hebrew speaking students at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem as a sub-group of Hebrew speakers. This focus on a micro-level speech act is part of a wider understanding of the importance of pragmatics to intercultural communication.  By examining linguistic choices in socio-linguistic interaction a lot can be learned about the pragmatic motives of speakers. Understanding pragmatic motivation is extremely beneficial in preventing pragmatic failure, which occurs when speakers apply the pragmatic patterns of their native language (L1) on the spoken foreign language (L2) (Thomas 1983). 

 When receiving a compliment, it is expected to show happiness or embarrassment, the latter is more expected from women. External compliments, on appearance, performance and possession are the most welcomed, while physical appearance, talent and personality compliments are perceived as interior and therefore less welcomed. A simple /to’da/ will always suffice, especially if you are men, but expressing your pleasure with the compliment is a good choice too, especially if you are a woman and the giver of the compliment is a woman as well. Try to avoid denial of the compliment, as acceptance is much preferred. The least expected sub-strategies are ‘return compliment’, ‘magnified acceptance’ and ‘soliciting confirmation’. If you wish to choose ‘acceptance with amendment’, your best bet will be ‘tempered acceptance’. If you wish to ignore the illocutionary force of the compliment and address it as discursive, the best option is to view it a ‘topic introduction’.

The comparatively large variation in response choice in the Israeli culture, compared to the Spanish culture for example (Siebold 2008) is a result of two things: 1) the relative newness of the Israeli society, which means cultural expectations are not yet fully established, and 2) The importance of the individual over the importance of the group; Israel has become very diverse and Capitalism and North-American influence raised the importance of the individual over the collective. 

 

Read Less
Tzemach Edan

Tzemach Edan

Jewish History

Read More
Subject: Jewish Women in Arab countries at the 19-20 Centuries and their Part in the Development of the Local Cu

Supervisor: Yaron Ben-Naeh

 

 

Read Less
jagay

Chagai Emanuel

Department of Talmud

Read More

Subject: Talmudic reasonning and the Sasanian context of the Babylonian Talmud

MA Honors 2018/19

Read Less
natan

Natan Evron

Department of Bible Studies

Read More
Subject: Nehemiah in Second Temple Period Literature: From the Bible to Josephus

Supervisor: Prof. Michael Segal and Dr. Ronnie Goldstein

Abstract: My research deals with the character of Nehemiah and the various traditions about him during the Second Temple period. The first part of the study will deal with the composition of the book of Ezra-Nehemiah in general, and in particular of the stories about Nehemiah, in order to recognize the original traditions about Nehemiah that are in it and the changes that took place in his character during the formation of the book. The second part will deal with the traditions about Nehemiah in the post-biblical literature – Sirach, 2 Maccabees, the Antiquities of the Jews by Flavius Josephus and more – and the relationship between them and the biblical text. 

Bio: Natan Evron has a B.A. in Biblical Studies and Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies from the Hebrew University and a M.A. degree in Biblical Studies and in Mandel's School's Honorary Program at the Hebrew University. His Master thesis dealt with some of the stories of David's rise to monarchy in 1 Samuel. His research focuses on biblical historiography and comparisons between the Bible and ancient Near Eastern cultures. Participates in a research project by Prof. Daniel Schwartz from the Hebrew University for the Reconstruction of the Lost Hebrew Version of 1 Maccabees.

Publications:

“'David is Hiding among Us': The Stories about David, Saul, and the Ziphites (1 Sam 23:19–24; 26:1).” In David in the Desert. Edited by Hannes Bezzel and Reinhard G. Kratz. BZAW; Berlin / Boston: de Gruyter, 2020 (approx.)

Rotenstreich 2020/2021

MA Honors Program 2015/2016

Read Less
Mara  Friedman

Mara Friedman

Jewish History & Contemporary Judaism

Read More
Subject: Conservative Judaism in Israel

Supervisor:  Prof. Eli Lederhendler

Abstract: The establishment and development of the Conservative Movement, as founded and promoted by American olim, and how it has had to adjust to the realities and desires of Israeli society. 

Read Less
mor

Mor Geller

Department of History 

Read More

Topic Public Opinion Polling and the Future(s) of the German Democratic Republic, 1966–1989

Supervisor Prof. Ofer Ashkenazi

Bio: I am a research student in history, focusing mainly on cultural history, Alltagsgeschichte, and knowledge production in Cold War Germany. I obtained my BA and MA from the same department and from the HUJI Institute of History Honors Program. I also participated in the Mandel School MA Honors Program, and am a fellow at the Koebner Center for German History. Between the years 2019-2021 I served as editor-in-chief of the student journal "Hayo Haya – a Young Forum for History." Beside my research, I am interested in cinema, socialism, and urban planning.

Abstract My dissertation will explore the widespread phenomenon of public opinion polling in East Germany and the multiple roles it played in the effort to sustain and reform the state’s power structure between the mid-1960s and the fall of the Berlin Wall. Through an analysis of the surveys and reports produced by the state-sanctioned social research institutes, I aim to establish the centrality of this method to the cultural, social, and political history of the German Democratic Republic and to understand the ways in which it was used by citizens in unexpected ways to imagine the future(s) of the GDR.

Publications:
Geller, Mor. “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Socialism: Education and Entertainment in the Musical Film Heißer Sommer (GDR, 1968).” Slil – Journal for History, Film, and Television (Forthcoming). [in Hebrew]

Mosse Stipend 2021/22

 

Read Less
Noa Goldblatt

Noa Goldblatt

Linguistics

Read More
Subject: The functions of Pennsylvania German auxiliary verb "duh"

Supervisor: Dr. Eitan Grossman, Dr. Larissa Naiditch

Abstract: In this study the main goal is to present a synchronic description of the functions of the poly-functional periphrastic duh (‘do’) construction in Pennsylvania German (PG). The secondary goal is to examine the PG data in comparison to other Germanic languages

Read Less
michal

Michal Goldstein

Musicology

Read More
Subject: Categorical Perception of Musical Intervals

Supervisor: Dr. Roni Granot

Abstract: My research examines categorical perception of musical intervals. Categorical perception is a cognitive phenomena in which a continuous stimulus is divided perceptually to create distinct units. The research aims to expand our knowledge on categorical perception to the music field, as well as study its implications to our understanding on cultural differences in music perception and on perfect pitch. 

Read Less
Yona Gonopolsky

Yona Gonopolsky

Classical studies and Comparative Religion

Read More
Subject: The Transition from The Upper Palaeolithic To the Epipalaeolithic In the Southern Levant And the Development of The Microlithic Technology.

Supervisor: Nigel Goring-Morris

Abstract: The doctoral dissertation focuses on one of the important developments in the of ancient hunting methods in the southern Levant. This change took place during the transition between the transition from the Upper Paleolithic to the Epipaleolithic periods (some 25,000 years ago), due to the development of microlithic tools (small stone tools, carefully designed in standard shapes, used to form composite projectile tools).
The study examines stone tool assemblages from several sites in the southern Levant from the end of the Upper Paleolithic and the beginning of the Epipaleolithic. By combine three different methods to analyze stone tool production (attribute analysis, experimental knapping and core refitting) the study aims to trace the source of this change and its evolution in terms of chronology, technology and style.
 

Bio: I have a BA and MA from the Classics Department of the Hebrew University. My PhD study deals with the verbal conceptualization of nonverbal cues in Ancient Greek. I am also interested in Greek phraseology in general, Greek sociolinguistics, representation of interpersonal communicative conventions in classical literature and characterization techniques in Greek literature. Also, I teach Greek and Latin and write and translate poetry (in and into Hebrew).

Publications:

From Jonah to Jesus and back: three Ways of Characterization and their Reverse Application (Paper in proccess)

President Stipend 2018/19

Read Less
Shir

Shir Hoory

Department of Art History

Read More

Subject: Ancient art

Abstract: The research focuses on early christian pilgrimage

Advisor: Prof. Rina Talgam

MA Honors 2019/20

Read Less
Nir Idan

Nir Idan

History

Read More
Subject: Charlatans in 17th Century Paris

Supervisor: Moshe Slohovsky

Abstract: My research deals with charlatans, medicine sellers who worked on stages in the market squares and streets, in 17th century Paris. Using texts documenting the performances of the most successful and well known duo of charlatans at the time I seek to position the phenomena in its context in terms of both history of medicine and history of theater. My goal is to understand how and why charlatans fashioned their unique style of performance, and what about it was appealing for their audience and customers.

Bio: I did my B.A. and M.A. in history in the Hebrew University. Co-editor of the journal “Hayo Haya – Young Forum for History”.

Presidential stipend 2016/17

Read Less
itay kagan

Itai Kagan

Bible 

Read More
Subject: The true plant in second temple literature

Supervisor: Prof. Menahem Kister

Abstract: The formula "eternal plant" and similar expressions are used in Second Temple Literature: Enoch, Jubilees and Qumran. The research focuses on this term from semantic, literary and theological perspectives.

Read Less
Ohad Kayam

Ohad Kayam

Arabic Language and Literature

Read More
Subject: The Qurʼānic rhymed prose

Supervisor: Professor Simon Hopkins

 

Read Less
Eliana Kessler

Eliana Kessler

Department of Linguistics

Read More
Subject: Valency Patterns and Alignment in Middle Persian

Supervisor: Dr. Eitan Grossman

Abstract: Middle Persian is a southwestern Iranian language, documented from the second century BCE to the ninth century CE. In my thesis I will use a large Middle Persian corpus to examine the valency patterns of approximately 70 verbs and describe the argument structure properties of different valency patterns in Middle Persian.

Read Less
uri

Ori Kinberg

Hebrew Literature 

Read More
Subject:  The Poems of Josef Zark and his Circle: Hebrew Literature in 15th Century Italy

Supervisor:  Dr. Jonathan Vardi and Prof. Amindav Dykman

Abstract:  During the 15th century, while Europe is swept by the Renaissance, numerous Jews of various ‎origins immigrate to Italy. Hebrew writers from Ashkenaz, Provence and Spain, alongside their ‎coreligionists of the local Italian communities, combine trends and traditions, composing a ‎literature that merges the religious and the secular, the old and the contemporary, the ‎imported and the local. ‎
My research begins with "Niv Sefataim (“Fruit of the Lips”), a collection of over 120 poems ‎written by Yosef Zark, an immigrant from Spain, and his circle of associates in northern Italy. ‎Through the network of relationships and exchanges reflected in this collection, I examine the ‎history and poetics of 15th-century Hebrew poetry in Italy.‎

Bio A graduate student in the department of Hebrew literature. I have studied my B.A. and M.A. in Jerusalem, first in Hebrew literature and Philosophy, later specializing in Medieval literature. I work mainly on Hebrew poetry written in Medieval and Renaissance Italy, and maintains an interest in analytic theories of literature and the philosophy of imagination.

President Stipend 2021/22

Read Less

Or Lankri

General and Comparative Literature

Read More
Subject: The Internal Canon: An In-Depth Study of the Single Artist's Oeuvre

Supervisor: Prof. David Fishelov

Abstract: My dissertation addresses the notion of internal canon, namely the selection of works associated with each artist. Many times, only a small portion of an artist's body of work becomes widely known. James Joyce, for example, is widely recognized as the author of the novels Ulysses and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, however few are aware that Joyce was also a poet and dramatist. Although this phenomenon touches most if not all artists of all mediums, it is rarely studied. In my dissertation I focused on a couple of writers and tried to determine which are their most canonical works by examining academic studies, literary anthologies, universities' syllabi, translations, literary adaptations and so on. In addition, I explored in which ways this limited selection of works with which these writers are identified is or isn't representative of their entire artistic production.

Read Less